FAQs

Q?

“What will the weather be like?” | Expect anything.

A.

June, July and early August are Alaska’s prime summer season. The weather can be very warm, in the 70’s or 80’s Fahrenheit, or it can be rainy and in the mid 50’s. Either way, expect mid 50’s in the morning and hope for warmer temperatures throughout the day. It’s always best to pack a few light weight versatile layers.

The midnight sun does indeed shine at Talaheim’s Alaska Fishing Lodge. During June and July, expect a full 20 hours of daylight. But by the 10th of August, Alaska’s fall arrives and we’ll start losing daylight. During this timeframe, our temperatures can drop to the 30’s in the early mornings, warming to the low 70’s throughout the day. August and September are known to be rainy. If rain occurs, expect temperatures in the 40’s throughout the day.

Q?

“Will there be lots of bugs?” | Why of course.

A.

What would an Alaska fishing adventure be without bugs? Our mosquito’s arrive in mid-June and thrive through July, unless the weather heats up. Most of our fishing is done in open areas, so if the weather is warm, the bugs won’t be a problem. However, if it’s overcast or wet, expect bugs. By August our mosquitoes are gone–just in time for the arrival of our no-see-ums! So either way, expect bugs.

If you don’t like flying insects, Cabela’s sells a great variety of bug headnets; or just bring a can of mosquito spray and you should be fine.

Q?

“What type of fishing equipment should I bring?” | Well, that’s a loaded question.

A.

Most fly fishermen bring two rods: a 9 foot #5 or #6 for trout, char, and grayling, and a 9 foot #8 or #9 for salmon. If you’re targeting king salmon on a fly, you might consider a stiff #10 rod with 100 yards of backing. Many of our king salmon fly fishermen are “swinging,” using double handed fly rods with Skagit heads and sink tips.

We have an assortment of rods available for our guests use, such as: #5, #6, #9 Temple Fork Outfitters fly rods and Ross fly reels, as well as Temple Fork Outfitters spinning gear. In addition, we also carry double handed rods. Please let us know prior to arriving should you want to utilize our fishing equipment.

Make sure to bring a sink tip and floating line for both rods. Most of our Alaska trout fishing is done with floating lines, with the occasional use of split shot in order to access the deeper fish. Alaska silver salmon typically bite on the water’s surface, so if you’re coming during silver salmon season bring some floating line for your salmon rod. Full sink lines are not necessary, but allow for 30 yards or more of backing for trout reels, and at least 100 yards of backing for the salmon reel.

Q?

“Can you tell me about rain gear, there are lots of choices.” | Our pleasure!

A.

Raingear is a necessity. We suggest a waterproof shell with hood or Gortex raingear with hood. Please note, ski or golf jackets typically aren’t an adequate means of protection in our Alaskan rain.

Other useful items may include: fingerless gloves, especially for August or September; a brimmed hat to keep off the glare; polarized sunglasses to protect from the sun (and wildly casted hooks!); a Buff Style neck wrap to offer sun and bug protection.

Q?

“What’s the deal with fishing waders? Do you provide them?” | Yes, but…

A.

Alaska’s Talaheim Fishing Lodge offers waders and wading boots in a variety of sizes for our guests use. However, please let us know prior to arriving should you want to utilize our waders, and provide your body and shoe size.

If you're bringing your own waders, please note that felt bottoms are illegal in Alaska. We suggest breathable waters with rubber bottom boots equipped with cleats or studs. Brands we tend to use and therefore suggest are Simms, Patagonia, Hodgeman andCabela’s.

Q?

“I’d like to bring my own flies, do you have any suggestions?” | You bet we do!

A.

Talaheim Lodge has a wide assortment of spinning lures, flies, sinkers, and leader material for our guests use, however, having your own nippers, hemostats, and floatant is helpful.

For fly fisherman that wish to bring their own flies, please refer to our suggested fly patterns. All salmon hooks should be tied on #2 quality hooks. Streamer hooks for trout and char should be tied on #2 to #4 hooks. Smaller grayling surface flies can be tied on #10 or #12 hooks.

For trout and char, matching the hatch in Alaska usually means salmon fry, salmon eggs, or salmon flesh, however, patterns like floating bass poppers, bumble bees and other “state-side” patterns also work well at times.

We offer a variety of fly tying material should you wish to tie your own flies while at Talaheim Lodge.

For the spin fisherman, Talaheim offers all hardware necessary. Typical lures for salmon consist of #2-#4 spinners, or pixie spoons, all with the required single-hook. Although fly tying material is complimentary, Talaheim Lodge does charge for any lures lost.

Q?

“Is there a dress code for dinner?” | No way.

A.

Attire at Talaheim’s Alaska Fishing Lodge is always casual. Because baggage space is limited, we suggest planning for layers and only bringing three complete changes of clothing, with daily changes of the necessities. Polypro or wool socks are great as they dry quickly.

Tennis shoes are best to wear around the lodge, but if you’re interested in heli-hiking the local mountain range, we suggest bringing light weight hiking boots.

Q?

“Can I bring my hard case Channel bag?” | Please don’t.

A.

Pack in soft duffel bags rather than your standard hard suitcases with wheels, as they stuff better into small aircraft cargo areas. However, we’d prefer two small duffel bags rather than one large “body bag” duffle. Sixty pounds of equipment and clothing per person is normal.

Fisherman should bring a day pack that can carry rain gear, camera, an extra reel, water bottle, mosquito spray, and any other daily necessity.

Q?

“What hotels do you suggest in Anchorage?” | Depends on what you’re looking for…

A.

If you're flying into Anchorage a few days prior to your trip to Talaheim, or plan to spend time in town after your fishing trip, then Captain Cook Hotel offers five star accommodations right in the heart of downtown. Walkable to museums, fine dining, shopping, as well as Anchorage's scenic Coastal Trail, experience why this hotel remains a historic icon of our city.

* Please note, Captain Cook does not offer shuttle service to or from Lake Hood airport. Typical taxi fare runs approximately $20 each way.

If you're flying into Anchorage and leaving for Talaheim the next morning, then a hotel close to Lake Hood Airport may be a better fit. In this case, we suggest The Lakefront Anchorage Hotel located on the lake that houses the largest seaplane base airport in the world. This hotel offers lake front dining and shuttle service to and from Talaheim's pick up point.

Another hotel that is easily assessable to the airport is Anchorage's Courtyard Marriott. Only two miles from Anchorage International, this Marriott offers several walkable dining options as well as shuttles to and from Talaheim's pick up point.

Q?

“Anything else I should know?” | Bring a swimsuit!

A.

That's right, bring a bathing suit! On warm days you’ll want to wear your suit under your waders so that you can “wet wade” with only wading boots and bathing suit or shorts once the sun sets in. On warm nights, we often take a dip in the river, or jump in the hot tub before or after dinner.